Jump to content
genjikatamori

getting back to shape

Recommended Posts

Regarding intermittent fasting:

 

There are lots of methods out there. I've done Renegade Diet and I've done Eat Stop Eat. I'm MUCH more partial to Eat Stop Eat, as it doesn't have so many damn rules. I have a tendency to make myself crazy if I have too many parameters. Renegade Diet is fun, pigging out every night. But if you forget to pig out, or you get busy, or whatever, you've just undereaten a LOT that day and will probably be cranky. I'm on Eat Stop Eat right now. Next fast is Wednesday-Thursday.

 

This page has a decent roundup of 5 popular methods: http://dailyburn.com/life/health/intermittent-fasting-methods/

Renegade, which I did, is halfway between Warrior and Fat Loss Forever.

 

 

Thanks, Mac. Very informative.

 

Xearsol: I would agree with Mac and say not to go at it alone; I personally think working out with another person who is knowledgeable and efficient is exponentially better than working out alone (especially at ground zero).

 

I have actually never seen someone purposefully flex at a gym  :rolleyes: I think it's inefficient use of time. Anyway, maybe you could start a small gym to get you going, like Planet Fitness. Their main marketing mechanism is 'no judgement zone'. Just got a non-contract $10 membership to get you started and when you feel confident enough get a membership at a more 'serious' gym. I myself started there and because I don't need to make everyone notice me with grunts weight-slamming, I do pretty well there. I'm also broke, so that's another upside. Sadly with the culture of Planet Fitness (whose philosophy radically changes the gym culture) you will see people who have no idea what they're doing. Be the exception to the rule; someone who CAN lift.

 

Yeah, where are you located? Somebody on here might even be up to work out with you if you feel like it.

EDIT: The trainers are usually awful. Their deplorable turnover means you'll probably see five trainers go through the gym throughout a year. There are a few gems here and there (One of the PFs I have gone to has a real tough lady with a very well sculpted physique, but the others...) that are ALSO the exception to the rule. 

Edited by roboprobo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hehe... I flex at the gym sometimes. And I like if people sneak a peek. But 6 years ago, I was in the same position as you, xearsol. Scared shitless to so much as set foot in the gym. But I did it anyways, eventually, after easing my way in at the apartment center gym (which was quite poor).

 

What got me on the right foot was when I joined a pretty high-caliber gym where part of the membership fee was a weekly training session. I about pissed myself signing up for that, heart pounding, hands shaking a bit.

 

Over time things got more comfortable, more familiar, and within two years I was the one going from gym to gym, very particular, to see which had good enough equipment for me to even think of training there. But that initial time, working with people who could help me along, was huge. Whether that person is a trainer, a friend, or the leader of some group classes, do work with someone who knows what they're doing, or at least knows more of what they're doing than you do.

 

Training partners can be tough to find sometimes, and it'll tend to involve just poking around your social network, or even finding some random person off the internet (where I found one of mine, we trained 8 months together). If you'd like, I can walk you through the process of finding a training partner, gym, classes, etc. I'm considering starting a business to that effect, it would be good practice.


You wouldn't walk into an orchestra rehearsal the first day, without having even touched an instrument, or even bringing one with you. Let's find you someone to show you the ropes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Mac. Very informative.

 

Xearsol: I would agree with Mac and say not to go at it alone; I personally think working out with another person who is knowledgeable and efficient is exponentially better than working out alone (especially at ground zero).

 

I have actually never seen someone purposefully flex at a gym  :rolleyes: I think it's inefficient use of time. Anyway, maybe you could start a small gym to get you going, like Planet Fitness. Their main marketing mechanism is 'no judgement zone'. Just got a non-contract $10 membership to get you started and when you feel confident enough get a membership at a more 'serious' gym. I myself started there and because I don't need to make everyone notice me with grunts weight-slamming, I do pretty well there. I'm also broke, so that's another upside. Sadly with the culture of Planet Fitness (whose philosophy radically changes the gym culture) you will see people who have no idea what they're doing. Be the exception to the rule; someone who CAN lift.

 

Yeah, where are you located? Somebody on here might even be up to work out with you if you feel like it.

EDIT: The trainers are usually awful. Their deplorable turnover means you'll probably see five trainers go through the gym throughout a year. There are a few gems here and there (One of the PFs I have gone to has a real tough lady with a very well sculpted physique, but the others...) that are ALSO the exception to the rule. 

the first time i went to gym is with my friend. now i have no more friend who have the same interest as me. most of my friend are busy with their project and have less time to spend on gym. planet fitness? never heard of it. sadly, i couldnt find any friend who is willing to go to gym with me. still having the thought of shameful to go to gym . im located somewhere near the middle of the ring on the earth. only two season here, hot and rain. money is not an issue, its myself is the issue i think. about my self confidence. 

 

 

Hehe... I flex at the gym sometimes. And I like if people sneak a peek. But 6 years ago, I was in the same position as you, xearsol. Scared shitless to so much as set foot in the gym. But I did it anyways, eventually, after easing my way in at the apartment center gym (which was quite poor).

 

What got me on the right foot was when I joined a pretty high-caliber gym where part of the membership fee was a weekly training session. I about pissed myself signing up for that, heart pounding, hands shaking a bit.

 

Over time things got more comfortable, more familiar, and within two years I was the one going from gym to gym, very particular, to see which had good enough equipment for me to even think of training there. But that initial time, working with people who could help me along, was huge. Whether that person is a trainer, a friend, or the leader of some group classes, do work with someone who knows what they're doing, or at least knows more of what they're doing than you do.

 

Training partners can be tough to find sometimes, and it'll tend to involve just poking around your social network, or even finding some random person off the internet (where I found one of mine, we trained 8 months together). If you'd like, I can walk you through the process of finding a training partner, gym, classes, etc. I'm considering starting a business to that effect, it would be good practice.

You wouldn't walk into an orchestra rehearsal the first day, without having even touched an instrument, or even bringing one with you. Let's find you someone to show you the ropes.

hahah, what i mean is i get intimidated by people who have big muscle and like to flex it on the mirror at the gym. im still scared shit to go to gym due to my body getting fatter cause of stress and exam. training partner is tough to find. no shit. even on the internet, the other guy who have the same interest is miles away from me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the gym is worth its shit, you shouldn't feel any shame. You go to the gym to improve your body, not to already have the body you want. People who are serious about training know this and will respect you for it. People who don't, well, who gives a flying fuck what they think?

 

Check this one out...

http://weknowmemes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/why-would-you-make-fun-of-a-fat-person-at-the-gym.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I see a new guy at the gym, my first instinct is to help them out. Usually I don't because it's typical gym etiquette to mind your own business, and it can be practically a religious war to try to suggest someone do something different than they are in a workout. This is where a trainer helps, or where a good gym that ENCOURAGES a baseline of competence in all their clients can make a big difference. Like the gym I'm at now.

 

I'll typically watch the new guy a bit, then offer some positive encouragement, comment on something I like about their form, or ask them about some exercise that I've never seen before. This gives them an opening to ask for my input. If they do, I gladly give it. If they don't, I go about my business and leave them alone.

 

About the only thing that really pisses off someone who's a gym veteran is a new guy who doesn't know what he's doing AND monopolizes equipment. So it behooves everyone in the gym for the new guy to learn basic etiquette and to go about their workout efficiently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I see a new guy at the gym, my first instinct is to help them out. Usually I don't because it's typical gym etiquette to mind your own business, and it can be practically a religious war to try to suggest someone do something different than they are in a workout. This is where a trainer helps, or where a good gym that ENCOURAGES a baseline of competence in all their clients can make a big difference. Like the gym I'm at now.

 

I'll typically watch the new guy a bit, then offer some positive encouragement, comment on something I like about their form, or ask them about some exercise that I've never seen before. This gives them an opening to ask for my input. If they do, I gladly give it. If they don't, I go about my business and leave them alone.

 

About the only thing that really pisses off someone who's a gym veteran is a new guy who doesn't know what he's doing AND monopolizes equipment. So it behooves everyone in the gym for the new guy to learn basic etiquette and to go about their workout efficiently.

how should i know if they arent laughing at me? u w u 

 

i never been approached when i went to gym

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whether or not they're laughing at you isn't your concern. You're too busy working out. That's not even a question you should have time to ask while you train.

 

Most places, they won't approach you. Usually it's unwelcome anyways.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just getting back to the gym after months of not going and I understand your feelings.
But lifts are going back up, and I'm feeling pretty good about it.
A few suggestions:
1. Don't let anyone in the gym's judgements about you stick. As mentioned earlier, if they can't see you're there for the same reason they are, they are not worth your time.
2. Diet: more important than training. Get enough protein and cals and you will grow. Bad habits don't have to be excised, but they have to be reduced. Be honest with yourself about that.
3. Training: you're on the Internet, use YouTube. Any newbie can learn a huge amount about training ideas, particular excercises, etc from YouTube. Watch many different videos on the same topic and see if any common ideas appear to you.
4. Most important: don't let anyone's negativity phase you. If you can see they are being less than supportive then they have revealed their character- it's lacking and they are not worth your time. Many of the biggest guys in my gym are the most supportive. I listen to them.
Good luck!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what should i do?

 

i was aiming to achieve to have at least 20% body fat from current 49%. what diet should i eat and how much. what kind of workout is suitable for me.

When it comes to diet, you need to figure out what changes you need to make to your current diet. If you're 49% body fat, you don't need some special diet, you just need to clean up your existing diet.

Do you drink a lot of carbonated, sweetened drinks (whatever they're called in your neck of the woods - in Australia, it's "soft drink", and I know some areas in America call it "pop", "coke", "soda", or other variations), and not a lot of water? If you do, that's a good thing to work on cutting out early. But don't just try to stop entirely in one hit. Instead, ease your way into it - replace one drink a day with water, for the next few weeks. Once you're in the habit of drinking water once a day, replace another drink with water.

Similarly, look at other parts of your diet? Are you eating a lot of chocolate? Try cutting back - replace a bit of chocolate with some fruit some of the time (bananas are particularly good, if you can get them cheap).

It might be valuable to keep a food journal for the next week or so, to see what sort of things you're actually eating.

My personal approach to the topic of diet is that you should cut down on "empty carbs". Empty carbs are carb-rich foods that don't provide significant nutritional benefits other than the carbs. Most fruits and vegetables are categorised as "carbs", but are great for overall health. It's not about trying to cut down on total carb intake, unless total carb intake is known to be too high. Rather, it's about ensuring high levels of nutrients (because your body is more likely to crave food if it's low on various vitamins and minerals). Nutritional foods leave you more satisfied, and thus less likely to eat too much.

I did notice some people above suggested intermittent fasting. It's the kind of thing you do when your diet is already top-notch. If you're eating pizza regularly, get McDonalds every few days, and have a tendency to gorge yourself on chocolate and coca-cola, then intermittent fasting is likely to be just another fad diet for you - something you try for a few weeks, lose a few kg, and then lose your willpower and end up gaining back more weight than you'd lost.

Instead, use the approach of sensible tweaking. If your body is used to taking in, say, 4000 Calories per day, then cutting back to 3900 Calories per day will start you losing some weight. Upping your activity by 200 Calories per day as well will probably see you losing about a kilogram every 4 weeks (about half a pound a week). And if you end up dropping 100 Calories in your diet each week, you'll be losing a kilogram a week in no time, without any of the stress of crash dieting.

That's my opinion, at least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.