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Mdlftr

Terrific explanation of how muscle "shape" is affected by genetics

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Hey Guys,

I just saw the following video about how everyone's muscle shape,  appearance, and size are affected by their genetics.  

Now, I realize the minute I say this, it sounds like a MAJOR Snooze fest.  I can hear people going, "Dude, heard that before.  Man up and work out, else, just get out of the gym and stop whining."

Yes, I get your point. HOWEVER, the host on this video, Igor, does a terrific job of providing pictures comparing famous bodybuilders to MMA fighters and NBA athletes to prove his point.  A guy can be a terrific basketball player, but his calves look like shrunken toothpicks, relatively speaking, compared to a pro bodybuilder who can't jump for sh*t but who has huge, full calves.  Think Jay Cutler versus Alonzo Mourning. 

 

He breaks our bodies down into 4 muscle groups that everyone works on and loves the look of, and explains how to evaluate and rate the aesthetic appearance from a bodybuilding point of view.  This is NOT about the scoring system in bodybuilding contests.  It's about how every guy has a different set of physical structures and proportions that impact the way his body looks, totally apart from the training regimen. 

I recommend the video.  It IS long - 24 minutes.  I had to really commit to sit down and watch it, but it  made it clear to me why my pecs don't look the same as Korean Bodybuilder Chul Soon's, even accounting for the work and *ahem!* supplements.  It actually made me understand, while  my biceps have a decent peak when I flex, the 2-inch gap between the bend of my elbow and the start of my bicep peak means that my arms don't look that big when my arms are hanging down at my sides, unflexed.  My biceps have much less mass than someone whose biceps go all the way to their elbow joint.  I have long tendons and short bicep muscle insertions.  Aesthetically, it doesn't lend itself to as much of a "wow" factor.   HOWEVER, this made me feel a LOT better, because I can appreciate how my muscles are a lot bigger, stronger and more aesthetically pleasing now, because of the work I've put into working them.   I don't look anything like a stunning example of male muscular development like a bodybuilder, but I look fantastic for myself.

 

Here's the 4 bodyparts evaluated:   [Note: Igor notes that this system of numbering that he uses to evaluate the relative merits of each body part is subjective, but it illustrates his point]

1. Abs. - Some people have 4 packs, some have 6 packs and some have 8 packs.  Arnold only had a 4 pack, believe it or not.  Jeff Seid has  a 6- pack.

2. Biceps - Muscle insertions and tendons.  Arnold (famously) had short tendons, meaning that his biceps were much longer than most people, so, when he flexed, his  biceps took up much more of the area of his upper arms and are HUGE.  HOWEVER, Arnold wasn't perfect - his right and left arm are asymmetrical.  The famous RIGHT arm, which is featured in many pictures, is noticeably fuller and rounder and bigger than his left biceps.  This is shown in the video.  See 19:00

3. Pecs - At 11:41 to 12:41.  The pecs are actually 3 bands of muscle - upper, middle and lower.  Not everyone can equally develop all 3 bands, so they end up looking either bottom heavy (saggy moobs) or top heavy (no bottom edge).  Arnold is shown as an example of someone whose pecs are so completely developed that they look like thick, square bricks.  Beautiful IMO.  
 

4. Deltoids - Not everyone can develop the 3 deltoid heads equally.  Again, Arnold is shown as an example of someone whose delts were well above average, but which didn't have the full roundness of say, a Robby Robinson.

 

Definitely worth your time:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDRFqrHCGbs

 

 

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Good points all and worth pointing out that while it's important not to use genetics as an excuse it's more just a factor to grasp, accept, and then work to maximize what you got.  Personally, I like shorter biceps because they accentuate the peak by standing off the forearm better than longer biceps which fight for space although that's hot too.  Or square pecs versus crescents seems mostly genetic yet I think getting all three bands to develop is as much focused training because all three are always present but require deliberate focus.  Genetics is what nature gave you; dedication is making the most of what nature gave you.

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3 hours ago, geek2jock said:

Good points all and worth pointing out that while it's important not to use genetics as an excuse it's more just a factor to grasp, accept, and then work to maximize what you got.  Personally, I like shorter biceps because they accentuate the peak by standing off the forearm better than longer biceps which fight for space although that's hot too.  Or square pecs versus crescents seems mostly genetic yet I think getting all three bands to develop is as much focused training because all three are always present but require deliberate focus.  Genetics is what nature gave you; dedication is making the most of what nature gave you.

Excellent points, geek2 jock!  I know what you mean about pecs-  mine ARE more like crescents than square blocks.  I realize now that is what I like, generically, about Mediterranean origin bodybuilders (Greeks and Italians).  Their body types tend to have the square, thick, blocky pecs, rather than the crescent shaped pecs.   Yummy!  Lol 

 

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