Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Trontastic

Sticking with it

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

My office has a small basement gym free for employees, and I want to make the most of it. But I recognise I have some serious mental hangups about going to the gym. I get myself through the door, then I flail around for half an hour trying the cable machines. Then I feel like i've accomplished nothing and will never see progress, so I lose motivation to go and it gnaws at me for a few weeks, where i'll go another one or two times and so on.

I've heard that once the habit of going to the gym is established, it's actually an addictive experience. I just have serious trouble getting to that point.

Long story short, what should I do?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know sying is simple, but just go. If you have a colleague that is going, just try to get him to motivate you. Have the same, with a good friend of mine. He has a gym at his company and we workout together. 😃

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Trontastic said:

Hi all,

My office has a small basement gym free for employees, and I want to make the most of it.

(...)

I've heard that once the habit of going to the gym is established, it's actually an addictive experience. I just have serious trouble getting to that point.

Long story short, what should I do?

 

I agree with @Raphi0508, that it is very helpful, to have a workout-buddy. Regardless if you have one or not, you need to write a schedule of exercises down, and bring your binder or sheet. It is also good to write down the settings you need for any adjustable seats, adjustable pads and adjustable supports for your back, and which weights you use. In the latter case, you will also easier follow your progress. 

You'll not see much changes happen to your body, if you exercise randomly or work out less than three times a week, so I suggest, that you write a schedule for three workouts a week down. You need to know WHY you are at the gym on any given day, otherwise you will "flail around", as you put it. There are many different ways to split your body, and other users here will be able to suggest a lot of alternatives, but one I have found useful is the following:

  • MONDAY: Legs and arms
  • WEDNESDAY: Chest and shoulders
  • FRIDAY: Back and abdomen

If you are particularly picky, you'll train front delts (anterior) and middle delts with chest, and rear delts (posterior) on back-and-abdomen day. That will give them a week to recover.

Do you understand enough of your own anatomy, to train all parts of each group of muscles? Symmetry and balance is important to avoid injuries and feel well. Do you need any suggestions regarding particular exercises, or do you have anyone to ask at your gym?

Edited by Hialmar
pads, coherence
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh and another thing: How much of a newbie are you? Are you familiar with sets and reps?

Rep is short for" repetitions".

A set is a group of repetitions with a pause between sets. It is polite to allow someone else to train a set while you pause. Beginners usually train about three sets of each exercise, but when you have become familiar with training, you may take part of the discussion about the ideal number of sets (usually more than three) and variations, like super-sets and others.

A set of many repetitions and comparatively light weights is a useful warm-up, and people who aim for endurance (but not explosive strength) are helped by this even outside warm-up. Gymnasts and football-players are helped by this.

A set of 6-10 repetitions and rather heavy weights is the most widespread and common among bodybuilders and fitness buffs. It maximize muscle volume.

Those who aim for powerlifting or strongman competitions use sets of fewer repetitions and very heavy weights, since this helps explosive strength -- which is the opposite of endurance.

Edited by Hialmar
comprehension

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It sounds like you would benefit from having a program.

I’m not qualified to give you advice on programming, and I don’t know what your starting position or goals are. I suggest finding a reputable beginner program online.

Or, hire a trainer/coach. When I started, I had to be taught how to do basic shit like set up my back for a deadlift. It doesn’t come naturally if you’ve lived a sedentary life. It also means you have someone to hold you accountable for following the program.

Once you have a program, write down everything you do in the gym. You might find it useful to set goals based on the progression outline in your programme e.g. squat your bodyweight within X weeks. Reward yourself if you succeed. Don’t beat yourself up if you fail. Exercise is hard, if it wasn’t then everyone would do it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Jay said:

When I started, I had to be taught how to do basic shit like set up my back for a deadlift. It doesn’t come naturally if you’ve lived a sedentary life.

This is very true. To find the position of knees and back for several types of rowing is another typical example. Or the big difference between using a short cable grip for triceps and using the same equipment for an unusual angle of chest. In the beginning, I didn't understand which muscles existed or what they were supposed to do.

It is an amazing experience, when the penny drops and body-awareness begin to dawn.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.