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NotJackedJack

Question about steel rods in arms

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I've been talking to a guy who says he is willing to transform his body. Right now, he says he currently has up to 10 pound weights. They are a little light, but he can't get anything heavier at the moment (for various reasons). What concerns me the most regarding his growth is that he says that 10 is pushing the limits for a singular arm. One of forearms has steel rods from when it was broken a long time ago. Obviously, I want a guy of with huge muscles and he says it can be done with enough work, but I'd like to hear others' input and experiences. 

I'm neither a medical person nor an athlete. My understanding of the body and bodybuilding is limited. In theory, anything is possible with enough work. But how much of a limiting factor are steel rods?

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I'm not a medical professional either, so don't take this as official medical advice.  But metal rods, screws, etc. are typically used when fractures are too complex for the bones to be set properly using a simple external cast.  The rods, etc. are surgically implanted to hold the bone pieces in the proper position while they heal, and are often left in place.  But the key thing is, once the bones are fully healed, they are as strong as new, just as with any other broken bone.  I very much doubt the presence of your friend's rods would be a limiting factor in the amount of strength he could build.  That said, depending on the details, they may cause pain, limit the range of motion, etc., but basic strength shouldn't be affected, and it's not like he's going to break a rod.  (Your friend should check with his doctor, of course, but that's the way these things generally work.)

I've had a piece of titanium in my elbow joint since I had a nasty complex fracture surgically repaired around 10 years ago.  After the surgery, I was very concerned about what my strength would be like after I healed, and if the implant would be a limitation.   I wondered if I'd even be able to do pushups.  I told my surgeon I was a weightlifter and asked if there any precautions I should take, lifts I shouldn't do, or limits to the weight I could/should lift.   His response was the most uplifting thing I heard during that very depressing period of my life:  "No limits" he told me, simply and without hesitation.  So, as soon as I was done with physio rehab, I went at it heavy, and within a year I was back to doing dips at 270 lbs bodyweight plus a 45 lb plate hanging from my waist.  Not bad for someone who was worried he'd never even be able to do a pushup again.  Still no problems ten years down the line.

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I've have two steel plates, two long screws (like short rods) and four short screws holding my elbow together from when I shattered my humerus into four pieces about 31 years ago. I got almost full extension back due to hard work at physical therapy, which led to taking up the weights, and there has been no limitation on strength increase or muscle growth. 

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